Diseases2019-07-12T23:00:45+00:00
DISEASES

Lymphoid & Myeloid

DISEASES

Lymphoid & Myeloid

Pushing the limits of diagnostic solutions for all hematologic diseases

Our innovations are based on challenging scientific questions. Our research and scientific collaborations back the development of cutting-edge hematologic diagnostics.

Pushing the limits of diagnostic solutions for all hematologic diseases

Our innovations are based on challenging scientific questions. Our research and scientific collaborations back the development of cutting-edge hematologic diagnostics.

Lymphoid

Lymphoid

Lymphoma is cancer that begins in infection-fighting cells of the immune system, called lymphocytes.

These cells are in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, bone marrow, and other parts of the body. When you have lymphoma, lymphocytes change and grow out of control.

Lymphoma is cancer that begins in infection-fighting cells of the immune system, called lymphocytes.

These cells are in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, bone marrow, and other parts of the body. When you have lymphoma, lymphocytes change and grow out of control.

Mature B-cell

B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are a clonal expansion of the various stages of  B lymphocytes in bone marrow, blood or other tissues.

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells. Normal plasma cells are found in the bone marrow and are an important part of the immune system. The immune system is made up of several types of cells that work together to fight infections and other diseases.

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (also known as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, NHL, or sometimes just lymphoma) is a cancer that starts in white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the body’s immune system.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults. It’s a type of cancer that starts in cells that become certain white blood cells (called lymphocytes) in the bone marrow. The cancer (leukemia) cells start in the bone marrow but then go into the blood.

Reference: Blood Journal / bloodjournal.org

Mature T-cell

Mature T-cell lymphoma is a rare type of cancer that develops when T-cells, which help fight infection and protect your immune system, begin to divide rapidly and uncontrollably.

This lymphoma is caused by infection with a virus called HTLV-1. It is rare in the United States, and much more common in Japan, the Caribbean, and parts of Africa – where infection with HTLV-1 is more common. It can affect the bone marrow (where new blood cells are made), lymph nodes, spleen, liver, skin, and other organs.

Reference: Blood Journal / bloodjournal.org
Hematologic Malignancy Research and Testing Menu
Hematologic Malignancy Research & Testing Menu

Myeloid

Myeloid

Myeloid malignancies are clonal diseases of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia) and acute (acute myeloid leukemia) stages. They are clonal diseases arising in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

Myeloid malignancies are clonal diseases of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia) and acute (acute myeloid leukemia) stages. They are clonal diseases arising in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are conditions that can occur when the blood-forming cells in the bone marrow become abnormal. This leads to low numbers of one or more types of blood cells. MDS is considered a type of cancer.

Reference: Blood Journal / bloodjournal.org

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) starts in the bone marrow (the soft inner part of certain bones, where new blood cells are made), but most often it quickly moves into the blood, as well. It can sometimes spread to other parts of the body including the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), and testicles.

Reference: Blood Journal / bloodjournal.org

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs)

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) are blood cancers that occur when the body makes too many white or red blood cells, or platelets. This overproduction of blood cells in the bone marrow can create problems for blood flow and lead to various symptoms.

Reference: Blood Journal / bloodjournal.org
Hematologic Malignancy Research and Testing Menu
Hematologic Malignancy Research & Testing Menu